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Here are the cactus we have sent so far. Stay a member to collect all 30 unique plants in 6 months!

May / November
Cactus of the Month

Melocactus Azureus

Melocactus or Melon Cactus comes from Mexico and Brazil, and there are about 40 species in this genus. This is a finicky genus. Everything needs to be just right--sun exposure, temperature, watering, soil composition, and drainage. Other cacti are more forgiving regarding their care. This genus takes a little more effort. The cactus pictured is M. azureus. This species has a blue-green body, hence the species name.

Old Lady Cactus - Mammillaria Hahniana

Mammillaria hahniana is a sun-loving cactus that forms large groups. It grows up to 10 inches (25 cm) tall and up to 20 inches (50 cm) broad. The solitary spherical stems, up to 5 inches (12.5 cm) in diameter, are covered in white down and white spines. Reddish purple flowers, up to 0.6 inches (15 mm) in diameter, are borne in spring and summer, sometimes forming a complete ring around the apex of the plant.

Ballon Cactus - Notocactus Magnificous

Balloon cactus will provide a pop of blue-green in any dry or firewise garden. Its blue-green globe features wool and golden spines along the vertical ribs. Forms large clustering mounds in time. Lemon yellow flowers in summer. Recently, the genus Notocactus has undergone nomenclatural changes, and as a result, all Notocactus are now included in the genus Parodia. At this time, it is believed that Notocactus and Parodias have sufficiently similar characteristics that they should be placed in one all-encompassing genus. Balloon cactus's Parodia name is Parodia magnifica. Water with caution in winter, as the plant can lose its roots if the soil stays cold and wet for extended periods.

Peruvian Old Lady - Espostoa Melanostele

Espostoa melanostele is a columnar cactus with dense white hair and golden spines. In time it will form a branched, tree-like column to 7 feet in height. Native to mountainous Peru at elevations of 4,000 to 7,000 feet. Prefers excellent air circulation and cactus soil with extra pumice or perlite for extra drainage. In cultivation, Peruvian old lady requires bright light to produce dense hairs, but, as a former mountain dweller, does not care for extremely high temperatures. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch, but water should be infrequent in the cold winter months and should not allow the soil to remain waterlogged. It is best to refrain from watering on cloudy, overcast or very humid days as well. Protect from frost, and from extreme heat.

Silver Ball Cactus - Notocactus schlosseri

Notocactus schlosseri is a globular cactus from South America. Very attractive with dense cinnamon spination and whitish areoles. Bright lemon flowers appear during late spring and summer. Less water in cold winter months. Protect from frost. Provide bright light. Hardy to 32F. Can Grow to 8" tall. Water thoroughly when soil is dry.

April / October
Cactus of the Month

notocactus ubellmannianus

Ferocactus Latispinus Devils Tongue Barrel

Stunning variety of barrel cactus that blooms at an early age. New young spines are a dramatic shade of pink, in striking contrast to the blue gray foliage. Excellent accent specimen for a waterwise rock garden or xeriscape, and thrives in containers.

Echinopsis Subdenudatum Dominoes

Echinopsis subdenudata is a pretty little cactus. The stem is globose to elongate up to 12 inches (30 cm) high with 8 to 12 -ribs, sometimes offsetting and sometimes not. It is almost spineless or with very short cream spines. The flowers are fragrant, white funnel-shaped, with long tubes, up to 9 inches (22 cm) long. It blooms from late spring to all summer long, the flowers open on the morning of the first day and remain opened all the night long but last only one day in full beauty, at the second day they start to wither.

mammilaria bocasana

Mammillaria bocasana is a clumping, spherical, blue-green cactus, up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) in diameter, with white, hair-like radial spines (one hooked), up to 0.8 inch (2 cm) long and 1 to 7 reddish-brown central spines up to 0.4 inch (1 cm) long. The flowers are funnel-shaped, creamy white to pinkish, up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) long and up to 0.6 inch (1.5 cm) in diameter. The fruit is cylindrical, rosy-pink to red and up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) long.

Mammillaria nejapensis “Silver Arrows”

Becomes slightly columnar to 6" in height, branching dichotomously (each single stem begins to divide to form two stems) to form large clusters. Related to Mammillaria karwinskiana. Flowers are pale yellow with reddish midstripe on each petal. Requires excellent drainage from porous cactus soil. Prefers bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

March / September
Cactus of the Month





February / August
Cactus of the Month

Bristle Brush/ Mammillaria pilcayensis

M. spinosissima subsp. pilcayensis - M. spinosissima subsp. pilcayensis is a tender cactus with a solitary, cylindrical, dark blue-green stem, yellow to greyish-white spines, and, in spring and summer, funnel-shaped, bright pink to magenta flowers blooming in a ring near the crown of the stem.

Gymnocalycium Mihanovichii Friedrichii

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii v. friedrichii is a beautiful small globular cactus from Paraguay. Globular stem typically has 8 or more deep ribs, forming sharp angles. Color of stems varies from greenish-purple to a dark grape color, and sometimes has crossbands of lighter color. Pink or white flowers appear first in March, and continue for many months. A variant of this plant, known as 'Hibotan', is well-known as the grafted "Moon Cactus". This variant form occurs when the plant lacks chlorophyll and its color manifests as beautiful yellows, pinks, oranges, reds or combinations of these colors. An excellent subject for windowsill culture. Requires porous cactus soil with adequate drainage. Prefers filtered light or shade.

Mammillaria Elongata 'copper king'

Mammillaria elongata is a succulent ground cover, forming with time a tight clumps of erect, ascending, prostrate or recumbent stems. This may be the most common Mammillaria to be found and occurs in more variations than any other Mammillaria species.

Blooming season: Spring, but can bloom for a second time later in the year.

Golden Barrel/ Echinocactus grusonii

Echinocactus grusonii, commonly known as mother-in-law’s cushion, stands out especially due to its golden spines, which form a beautiful contrast to the lush green of the cactus’ body.

Thimble Cactus/ Mammillaria gracilis fragilis

This beautiful, small cactus has a cylindrical green body covered in interwoven white spines. “Thimble Cactus” grows in clusters, and propagates very easily. You can expect to see tiny cream-colored flowers in cooler months.

January / July
Cactus of the Month

mammallaria elegan

Mammillaria elegans, native to Mexico, is a globular cactus with dense white spines and white wool. Long-lasting rings of majenta flowers provide beautiful contrast to white, woolly body. Forms clusters in time. Requires cactus soil with excellent drainage. Prefers bright light for best form. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to touch. Refrain from watering on overcast, cold winter days. Protect from frost.

oreocereus trolii "old man of the andes"

Oreocereus trollii, native to mountains of South America, forms clumping clusters of chunky columns to 2' in height. Columnar stems are densely covered in white wool (actually white radial spines that have evolved to resemble "hairs"), that totally obscures body of plant. Some bright red spines are visible above the wool . Flowers are violet red and semi-tubular in shape. Bright light for best appearance. In cultivation, Oreocereus requires bright light to produce dense hairs, but, as a former mountain dweller, does not care for extremely high temperatures. Prefers porous cactus soil with adequate drainage. Bright light to full sun with ample airflow.

trichocereous grandiflorus

Colors now includes yellow, gold, white, pink, light pink with rose midstripes, orange, red, and purples. Some flowers are actually bi-colored. In a some cases, flower size has increased to 9" in diameter, rivalling some of the Epiphyllums, or orchid cacti. Through hybridization, the actual appearance of the plant as changed as well. The stems of the type species are somewhat slender, and sometimes become a bit prostrate. Many newer hybrids have thick, cylindrical bodies to 10" in diameter, with offsets forming specimens that span several feet in diameter.

cereous ming-thing

This lovably abnormal thing is quite a “thing” indeed...“Ming thing.” It’s a monstrose (monster) form of Cereus forbesii (aka C. validus), meaning that it exhibits naturally occurring mutant growth, in the form of sculptural club-like shapes. Woolly areoles and short black spines appear on top of these myriad bizarro stems, which kind of resemble rounded, clenched fists. Ming thing is excellent for windowsill or dish garden culture.

gymno calcium "chin cactus"

Gymnocalycium baldianum (chin cactus) is a semi-flattened globular dark green, species with appressed spines along shallow ribs. It also produces absolutely dynamite flowers. They’re 1.5 inches in diameter and can be white, light pink, red, hot pink, or even coral or salmon. Prefers filtered light or shade. Plant in a porous cactus mix with adequate drainage. Gymnocalycium species, as a rule, do not care for hot, stuffy locations, instead preferring cool, airy, shady areas.

December / June
Cactus of the Month
(5 of 6 shown)

Echinopsis "Rose Quartz"

This incredibly floriferous peanut cactus is a hybrid (Chamaecereus x Lobivia), with both genera now under the Echinopsis umbrella. The flowers are to 3 inches in diameter, rose-colored, and tinged with purple highlights. Not only is 'Rose Quartz' very appealing, but it's also very resistant to insects such as mealybugs and to pathogens such as soft rot. It becomes dormant in stifling summer heat, as the original Chamaecereus is native to mountainous regions of South America. Echinopsis (xChamaelobivia) 'Rose Quartz' is an Altman Plants original hybrid

Blue Candle/Pilosocereurs

This is a beautiful glaucous (bluish-silver) cactus with an elegant habit (growth form) that makes it look like a miniature blue Saguaro. Even the spines are a pretty yellow hue, and are not designed to puncture skin.

Oroya Peruviana

This is a variable species from Peru, usually a solitary flattened stem that eventually becomes a short column. The spines are more or less curved toward the body and look super nifty in the sun. The flowers are small, pink, and bloom in the summer.

Golden Ball/Notocactus leninghausii

Recently, the genus Notocactus has undergone nomenclatural changes, and as a result, all Notocactus are now included in the genus Parodia. At this time, it is believed that Notocactus and Parodias have sufficiently similar characteristics that they should be placed in one all-encompassing genus. Requires porous cactus soil with adequate drainage. Bright light to full sun. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

mammillaria prenglei

Mammillaria pringlei, native to Mexico, is sometimes considered a subspecies of Mammillaria rhodantha. The stem is covered in dense, golden spines, sometimes curling to lengths of 1" or more. The stem can reach 8" in height, and nearly as much in width. Rings of deep pink flowers appear in summer. This species grows quickly and is very easily grown. Porous cactus soil with adequate drainage. Bright light with ample airflow. Water thoroughly when soil is dry to the touch. Protect from frost.

Unidentified Beauty

Unidentified Beauty